Irish Revel by Edna Brien

Irish Revel by Edna Brien

People believed that all residents of Ireland are funny and noisy. They drink a lot and love good parties. Any Irishman can have fun until late at night or even morning. But Mary is not very similar to other Irish. She is seventeen. She is a modest girl and lives on a remote farm. She rides an old bike to her first party in life. The girl is driving along a picturesque road in the mountains. She is expecting the evening to be unusual and pleasant. Suddenly, the front wheel burst. This is not unusual, as the bike is older than Mary. She is used to hard work and difficulties. When you live far from civilization, you have a lot of work. The girl has to take care of the household, the animals and three other children in the family. Her father works a lot and is ever not at home.

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Irish Revel by Edna Brien

The Irish are said to be good at parties, noisy revels with drinking, singing, and dancing late into the night. But Mary, seventeen and living on a lonely farm, has no experience of them, and as she cycles down the mountain road to her first party in the town, she is full of hopes and dreams and expectations…

Irish Revel by Edna Brien

Mary hoped that the ancient front tyre on the bicycle would burst. Twice she had to stop to put more air in it, which was very annoying. For as long as she could remember, she had been putting air in tyres, carrying firewood, cleaning out the cow shed, doing a man’s work. Her father and two brothers worked for the forestry company, so she and her mother had to do everything, and there were three children to take care of as well. Theirs was a mountainy farm in Ireland, and life was hard.

But this cold evening in early November she was free. She rode her bicycle along the road, thinking pleasantly about the party. Although she was seventeen, this was her first party. The invitation had come only that morning from Mrs Rodgers, owner of the Commercial Hotel. At first her mother did not wish Mary to go; there was too much to be done, soup to be made, and one of the children had earache and was likely to cry in the night. But Mary begged her mother to let her go.

‘What use would it be?’ her mother said. To her, all such excitements were bad for you, because they gave you a taste of something you couldn’t have. But finally she agreed…

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